Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies

I’ve baked plenty of Christmas cookies, but had never baked Halloween cookies.

This was the year to change that.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

These sprinkled-up cookies are buttery soft, tender, slightly chewy without any cakiness.

They’re based on two recent favorites, Softbatch Funfetti Sugar Cookies and Lofthouse-Style Soft Peanut Butter Chip Sugar Cookies.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

I love the baked-in sprinkles in the Softbatch Funfetti Cookies. It’s such a timesaver not having to frost and decorate cookies when all you want to do is dive into them, not frost them.

I adapted the dough base from the Lofthouse Peanut Butter Cookies, because it’s soft and lightweight, without being dry or crumbly.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

Real Lofthouse Cookies are the incredibly soft, featherlight cookies sold in grocery store bakeries, with a signature layer of frosting and sprinkles.

These cookies are similar to the real thing, thanks in part to using cake flour. Normally I shy away from using ingredients you may not have on hand, but in this recipe, it’s irreplaceable and creates the classic soft, light Lofthouse-style cookie.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

You can buy it in any grocery store baking aisle, Target, or other big box stores. It’s inexpensive and you can make these cookies or these with it, too.

A DIY version of cake flour can be made by measuring out 1 cup all-purpose flour, removing 2 tablespoons of it, and in its place, adding 2 tablespoons cornstarch. Then, sift the flour and cornstarch together at least 3 times for the ultra-fine, soft texture that cake flour is known for. That sounds like way too much work and I’d rather buy it, but suit yourself.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

I also added cornstarch. It’s a true workhorse in cookie-baking because it helps create a super soft and supple texture.

I’ve used it in at least 15 cookie recipes, including Lofthouse-Style Soft Peanut Butter Chip Sugar CookiesPumpkin Spice CookiesPeanut Butter Coconut Oil CookiesM&Ms CookiesSnickers CookiesTwix Bar CookiesCaramel Corn Chocolate Chip Cookies, and Smores Cookies. You’ll love the softbatch-style results.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

I used one-half cup of 3 different types of sprinkles, each from the Target dollar bins. Love those bins for fun finds like sprinkles, spatulas, and cupcake liners. I only wish my impulse buys at Target were confined to the dollar bins section.

Two types of sprinkles are multi-colored jimmies and one type is minuscule orange, yellow, and white non-pareils (little balls). Use your favorites and notably there’s a very high sprinkle-t0-dough ratio. If you don’t love sprinkles as much as I do, 1 cup may be enough.

The dough is very soft and borderline sticky, and must be chilled before baking or the cookies will spread into flat puddles. I prefer to chill it at least overnight, and there’s no harm in letting it chill for up to 5 days and then bake off just 4 or 6 cookies, or as needed.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Like the real thing but with sprinkles! Easy recipe at averiecooks.com

Make sure not to overbake, even if they seem light, glossy, and pale at the 8 to 9  minute mark because they firm up as they cool. They’re best when they’re super soft without any browning and if you overcook them, by day 2 they’ll be on the crunchier rather than softer side.

My cookies don’t spread much while baking and I give them a gentle tap-tap with the back of a spoon right as they come out of the oven. If yours emerge from the oven as domed igloos, flatten them a bit.

They’re soft, buttery, and just melt in your mouth. The abundance of sprinkles adds texture and little pops of flavor in every bite. Some of the sprinkles I used were chocolate and some bites were subtly chocolaty. Bonus.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

Around Christmas, substitute red and green sprinkles for easy, no-roll, soft sugar cookies. And feel free to frost the cookies with your favorite vanilla buttercream or or vanilla cream cheese frosting, or make sandwich cookies with them.

I can’t believe I’m already thinking about holiday baking and Christmas cookies. Let’s get through Halloween first. Boo.

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies - Just like real Lofthouse cookies but with sprinkles baked in! Soft, buttery & they just melt in your mouth!

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Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies

The texture of these cookies is similar to Lofthouse-Style sugar cookies. They're buttery soft and light, without being airy or cakey. The abundance of sprinkles add texture, flavor, and whimsy. The recipe calls for cake flour, and in the blog post, there's a tip to make it yourself if you don't have it on hand. It's a must-have, and keeps the cookies so soft that they just melt in your mouth. Make sure to chill your dough so the cookies won't spread. When properly chilled, the cookies don't spread much. If they stay domed while baking, gently tap them with the back of a spoon to flatten as they emerge from the oven. Around Christmas, substitute red and green sprinkles for easy, no-roll, soft sugar cookies. Feel free to frost the cookies with your favorite vanilla buttercream, or make sandwich cookies with them.

Yield: about 15 med/large cookies

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: about 8-9 minutes

Total Time: 3+ hours, for dough chilling

Ingredients:

1 large egg
1/2 cup unsalted butter (1 stick), softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups cups cake flour, see directions (no substitutions, I used Swans Down)
2 teaspoons cornstach
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4  teaspoon baking soda
pinch salt, optional and to taste
up to 1 1/2 cups sprinkles (reduce to 1 cup if you don't love sprinkles; I used 1 cup of larger jimmies and 1/2 cup minuscule nonpareils)

Directions:

  1. To the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or large bowl and electric hand mixer), cream together the first 5 ingredients (through vanilla) on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.
  2. Stop, scrape down the sides of the bowl, add 1 3/4 cups flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, optional salt, and mix on low speed until just incorporated, about 1 minute; don't overmix. Dough will be on the sticky and tacky side.
  3. Mix in 1 cup sprinkles, and as desired, add remaining 1/2 cup.
  4. Using a medium 2-inch cookie scoop, form heaping 2 to 3-tablespoon mounds (I made 15). Place mounds on a large plate, flatten slightly, cover with plasticwrap, and refrigerate for at least 3 hours, or up to 5 days, before baking. Do not bake with warm dough because cookies will spread and bake thinner and flatter.
  5. Preheat oven to 350F, line a baking sheet with a Silpat or spray with cooking spray. Place mounds on baking sheet, spaced at least 2 inches apart (I bake 8 cookies per sheet) and bake for about 8 to 9 minutes, or until edges have set and tops are just beginning to set, even if slightly undercooked, pale and glossy in the center. Do not overbake because cookies will firm up as they cool. If cookies stayed domed while baking, tap gently a couple times with the back of a spoon to flatten. Allow cookies to cool on the baking sheet  for about 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to finish cooking. Cookies will keep airtight at room temperature for up to 5 days. Unbaked cookie dough can be stored airtight in the refrigerator for up to 5 days, or frozen for up to 4 months, so consider baking only as many cookies as desired and save the remaining dough to be baked in the future when desired.

Adapted from Lofthouse-Style Soft Peanut Butter Chip Sugar Cookies with Peanut Butter Frosting

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Thanks for the entries in the Pair of Le Creuset Mini Cocottes Giveaway and the 10 Bars Craft Chocolate Giveaway ($100 Value)

Lofthouse cookie fan? Are you making anything special for Halloween?
   

86 Responses to “Lofthouse Soft Sugar Sprinkles Cookies”

  1. #
    51
    Amanda — November 15, 2013 at 4:27 am

    Question for you. If I want to make these just like the store bought ones, can I leave the sprinkles out of the dough? I would like to frost them and just add sprinkles on top. I’m not a huge fan of sprinkles. If so, what frosting would you recommend?

    Reply

  2. #
    52
    Suzanne — December 8, 2013 at 5:16 pm

    Hello! I have chosen these cookies for our cookie exchange (a Christmas sprinkle version). I’m making my grocery list and noticed that one batch only yields 15 cookies – is that accurate? I need to make 13 dozen total cookies!

    Reply

    • Averie Sunshine replied: — December 8th, 2013 at 5:28 pm

      Yes, this is not a “huge” batch of cookies. I bake for my very small family and if you need to bake in big(ger) quantity, then you’ll have to double, triple, etc the recipe as necessary!

      Reply

  3. #
    53
    Aleesha Banks — January 25, 2014 at 1:53 am

    I love this. The decoration is so simple in process, but wow, huge overall finish with such a visual impact!

    Reply

  4. #
    54
    Karenb — April 29, 2014 at 12:05 pm

    I made these cookies Yesterday and was disappointed with how mine turned out. They were puffy and thick coming out of the oven but rapidly deflated as they cooled. They were totally flat by the time I needed to transfer them to a cooling rack.

    I am an experienced baker and cannot figure what I did wrong. I reviewed the recipe several times and followed it to a “T.” The ONLY change I made was to double the recipe. But I doubled all the ingredients, so they should have been okay. I chilled them overnight before baking. My baking powder & soda were fresh. Is the 2 tsp Cornstarch correct(for single recipe)? It seems like this small amount would not have any effect on the recipe. PLEASE advise.

    Reply

    • Averie Sunshine replied: — April 29th, 2014 at 12:33 pm

      It sounds like you did everything right. I have no idea what to say! I have never doubled this recipe so while that could be the culprit (some recipes just aren’t made for doubling, i.e. bread sometimes, or canning things) but cookies are generally pretty safe. My first thought would be to check the baking powder/soda but you say that’s fine. When you creamed things, maybe you should cream a little longer to really aerate and fluff the batter but you do sound like an experienced baker so you know what’s appropriate and what’s not. 99% of the time when people write to me with a glitch or an issue, I can instantly pinpoint it. With yours, I am not sure. Maybe it was the double. That said, these aren’t super thick or puffy cookies.

      Okay one thing just dawned on me. The kind of flour you’re using. I use and swear by King Arthur all-purpose. It has a slightly higher gluten content than other brands and that gives things more structure and they rise better and stay risen better. Maybe your flour. i.e. Gold Medal and others are much lower gluten and your results will not be as ‘puffy’ as with KA. That could be it!

      Reply

      • Karenb replied: — May 1st, 2014 at 12:59 am

        Thanks for responding. I used Swans Down Cake Flour as the recipe stated.
        Was I supposed to use all-purpose flour? Since the cookies were so flat and dense, I could not distinguish a difference in texture from using the Cake Flour and cornstarch.

        I made cookies with Swans Down Flour and cornstarch before and the cookies were very tender, but I used at least 1/2 C Cornstarch. The 2 tsp Cornstarch does not seem like enough to make a difference in this recipe.
        I have heard of making your own Cake Flour by using 2 TBS less per cup of all purpose flour and adding a few tsp cornstarch.

        Would the humidity have effected the recipe? It was really hot (86 Degrees, high humidity), but I had the air cond. on and my house was “relatively” cool.

        I’ll have to try this recipe again on a cooler day. Unfortunately, those days may be far and few until the fall. We do not have much of a Spring in Texas. It’s supposed to be in the 90’s this weekend!

        • Averie Sunshine replied: — May 1st, 2014 at 2:32 am

          It’s so hard to tell what happens in someone’s kitchen from emails and trying to take into account all the variables with climate, brands of ingredients, etc. and so many people writing and trying to keep everyone’s baking experiments and questions straight but yes humidity always effects baking and tends to make things denser since there’s more moisture in the air. And yes you can make your own cake flour in a pinch but it’s something I choose to buy if a recipe calls for it, just because that way I know for sure I am starting off on the right foot and don’t have to take into account that variable. I would say yes just remake on a less humid day and do your best :)

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